• From Scott McCloud’s blog

    The sad state of student engagement in 2024

  • As we look at how to shift our instruction in a world where students can plagiarize easily using genAI tools, we can’t ignore the important roles of motivation. As Andy Famiglietti writes here, plagiarism and cheating become pointless when the learner wants to master the content, not simply receive the credentials for doing so.

    afamiglietti.org/uncategor…

  • What strikes me the most about this research article is NOT the power of “asset-based instruction” (that focuses on a student’s strengths rather than their deficiencies) but rather than this is not just a big problem in edtech applications but also in the education at large. We spend so many words and so much funding trying to close “learning gaps” and that kind of language must have a negative effect on students.

    learninganalytics.upenn.edu/ryanbaker…

  • Learned a lot from this discussion of AI-powered assessibility tools: hechingerreport.org/opinion-a…

  • I’m really looking forward to reading this new book about the perils of grading

    www.press.jhu.edu/books/tit…

  • readwise.io/reader/sh…

  • EmulatorPalooza

    www.macstories.net/news/emul… This new wave of retro game emulators for iOS has me really enjoying playing the games of my youth on a similarly sized screen. I just wish there was a marketplace for good-quality legal ROMs. read more

  • Thanks, ChatGPT

    Scroll through social media for just a few minutes and you’ll get the impression that teachers hate Artificial Intelligence tools like ChatGPT for the way that they make it much easier for students to get away with cheating. And, sure, that’s an issue that needs to be discussed and … read more

  • GradeLess Presentation 2023

    I had the incredible honor of presenting at the Kenan Fellows Program’s Fall Institute last week. Aside from having to follow the amazing Phil Boyte, the toughest part of providing professional development to this amazing group of educators is making sure that the quality of the presentation … read more

  • TeachThought’s Article about “What Teachers Need”

    In general, I’m not a fan of these “listicles”, but Terry Heick does a great job of adding editorial content that explains why each of these items is important to teachers.

    I also happen to agree with most of this list. The section on hierarchies among teachers is really salient:

    “It is often clear in a building who is where in the pecking order. ‘Teacher leaders’ versus teachers favorited by administrators. Teachers in ‘tested’ content areas (e.g., math) versus non-tested content areas (e.g., art). Teachers who the students loved and teachers who the parents were constantly questioning (which in and of itself can often be a good thing that’s a sign of a deficit), the hierarchy of teachers in schools never seems to make for positive results.”

  • “I’m merely offering more to those who want to help me afford rent, groceries, and a used scooter for getting around town. Think of it as Education+.”

    Fantastically funny (and starkly accurate) piece from McSweeney’s by Perry Kent

  • I’m working on some teacher PD around ChatGPT and the coming AIpocalypse, and I am blown away by how much this feels like the uproar over using calculators in class. I recognize the many differences, but I am excited about the shift from students learning to “generate text” to them learning to edit, proofread, fact-check, etc.

  • If you aren’t reading the Atlas Obscura blog, you are missing out. I have always loved the writing in their book and their website that explore little-known locations all over the world. At the end of every year, they collect their favorite Science stories into one article. Check it out!

  • The teacher shortage in Mississippi is among the worst in the nation - The Washington Post

    Not sure whether it feels better or worse to know that other schools are experiencing this dire shortage of teachers.

  • Sure, grades aren’t so bad. If this is how you define grades.

    Most folks who know me also know how I feel about grades. I am not a fan. And the reasons that I dislike grades so much are easy to understand. They stop learning. They create unhealthy pressure on kids. They don’t give students a way forward. They don’t successfully accomplish their primary goal: … read more

  • I love the focus on making students more independent in their learning. But I can also relate to the concern that students become dependent on us when we are engaging and exciting at the front of the room

    www.edutopia.org/article/e…

  • Why is this school year SO much more exhausting?

    Spend any time in online teacher communities or talking to educators this year and you will inevitably hear them express with exhaustion in their voice what a tough year this has been. But dig a little deeper and it gets more difficult to put your finger on exactly what is different about this year. … read more

  • One Reader to Rule Them All

    I’ve been an avid reader on the Web for a while now, as I know many of you are. I’ve had RSS reader apps (Google Reader RIP, Feedly, Reeder), read-later apps (Pocket, Instapaper) and even highlighting apps (Diigo). But until now, I needed to stitch together different tools to do all of … read more

  • Great Resignation, Great Recession, or Great Depression?

    We’ve all heard about “The Great Resignation” when large numbers of employees quit their jobs at the tail-end of the COVID-19 lockdown after experiencing the benefits of working from home. We have seen the impact of the economy on individual workers as a shortage of potential workers has led to one … read more

  • Mulling over Mastodon

    Like many in the Twitterverse, I am currently exploring whether that is still the best network for me to cultivate and participate in. The trend has been heading in a negative direction for a while, but recent changes have me (and millions of other “bird app” users) considering some of the … read more